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California Colloquium on Water

California Colloquium on Water

The California Colloquium on Water was a popular, decade-long series of lectures hosted by WRCA at UC Berkeley. Scholars of distinction in the fields of natural sciences, engineering, social sciences, humanities, law and environmental design presented monthly lectures. These lectures are designed to increase the understanding and appreciation among students, faculty and the general public of water resources and to contribute to informed decisions about water in California.

Below is a list of past lectures, alphabetical by speaker's surname. Most lectures are available for loan on DVD. Streaming video, PowerPoint, and other electronic visual aids are provided below, when available.

MWD Funded

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD) graciously funded the digitization of the California Colloquium lectures 2001-2004. All taped lectures are available online on YouTube.

Past Lectures

Lecturer/Date Title/Abstract Video / Powerpoint
Alley, William M.
October 9, 2007
Chief, Office of Ground Water, U.S. Geological Survey "Tracking the Nation's Ground Water Reserves"
Abstract: During the past 50 years, groundwater depletion has spread from isolated pockets to large areas in many countries throughout the world. A growing awareness of groundwater as a critical natural resource leads to some basic questions. How much groundwater do we have left? Are we running out? Where are groundwater resources most stressed? Where are they most available for future supply? This presentation discusses how the issues associated with groundwater depletion have evolved, what we know about the Nation’s groundwater reserves today, and approaches to improve upon that knowledge base at the regional and national scale.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0158

PDF of PowerPoint
(44 slides)
Andrews, Edmund
April 12, 2005
Hydrologist & Chief of River Mechanics Project, U.S. Geological Survey "The Influence of Enso Phase on Floods & Sediment Transport in California Coastal Streams"
YouTube
VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0139
Asano, Takashi
December 11, 2001
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis "The role of water reuse"
YouTube
VHS available at 
WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0112

PowerPoint
(15.7MB)
Avalon, Mitch
April 14, 2009
Deputy Public Works Director, Contra Costa County "Converting Concrete Channels in Urban Settings into Natural Creeks and Streams: The 50-Year Plan"
Abstract: How can communities in urban areas convert their concrete flood control channels into natural stream systems? What are the benefits to the owner of a channel, often the flood control district, to convert their channels to natural streams? What role should the flood control district play, or the community play, or non- profit groups play or regulators play in achieving this vision? This talk will explore these questions and the concept of using long range planning such as a "50 year plan" to accomplish this.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0172

PDF of PowerPoint

(29 slides)
Benton, Charles
December 4, 2007
Professor of Architecture, UC Berkeley "A Camera Aloft: California’s Wetlands and Streams from a Bird’s Perspective"
Abstract: Given a chance I suspect that most of us would slip our earthly bonds and see the world from new heights. An aerial view offers a fresh perspective of familiar landscapes and in doing so challenges our spatial sensibilities, our grasp of relationships. This playful talk will chronicle ten years of aerial photography from kite-lofted cameras. Examples will be shown from California’s wetlands including the South San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds, Herons Head Park, and the Berkeley/Albany Codornices Creek restoration project. Along the way Professor Benton will touch on the history of early aerial photography as well as methods and motivations for using kites as a photographic platform in the current day. Simultaneously an art form and a remote sensing exercise Benton’s low-level approach yields photographs that can be beautiful, useful, or both.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0160

HTML presentation
Bettner, Thaddeus L.
April 11, 2006
Deputy General Manager - Resources, Westlands Water District "Utilizing California's Water Supply Efficiently and Effectively"
Abstract: Westlands Water District consists of an area in western Fresno and Kings counties made up of 600,000 acres of farmland. This agricultural hub produces much of the state and nation's tomatoes, cotton, sugar beets, and asparagus. Water used to sustain this historically arid soil comes from the 20 dams and reservoirs of the Central Valley Project (CVP). This water, however, is not easily obtained as pro-agriculture organizations (such as Westlands), environmentalists, fisherman and anglers, and other groups vie for the same water. Bettner will take the podium to discuss Westlands Water District and the agricultural use of water within the CVP export area.

YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0147

PowerPoint
(41 slides)
Box, W.T. (Tom), Jr.
December 9, 2003
Vice President, Geothermal Resource Management, Calpine Corporation "The geysers : the nature, development & preservation of a unique resource"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCAG402 XU2-9 #0128

PowerPoint
(44.2MB)
Brechin, Gray
March 9, 2004
Reasearch Fellow, Department of Geography, UC Berkeley "Rotten foundations: the Reclamation Act & urbanization of the west"
Dr. Brechin is a noted historian and author of Imperial San Francisco : Urban Power, Earthly Ruin (1999) [WRCA call no. G4795 N9 Locked Cage].

YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0130
Cain, John
September 11, 2007
Director, Restoration Programs, Natural Heritage Institute "Confluence, Confusion, or Catastrophe: Prospects for Ending the Delta Stalemate"
Abstract: The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta - the source water for more than 20 million people and habitat for several endangered species- is the geographic center of a decades long-debate on how best to share water between northern and southern California. For years, the Delta debate has deadlocked on the amount of water the state and federal water projects divert out of the Bay- Delta ecosystem, but recent reports and crises have refocused the debate on a larger set of issues including levee fragility, climate change, flood plain development, upstream diversions, and new strategies for diverting water out of the Delta. Dividing up the Delta’s water is only part of the problem. Delta stakeholders now realize they must also figure out how to restore habitats, sustain fragile levees, protect farmland, and clean-up polluted run-off. The Governor has convened several forums including Delta Vision and the Bay Delta Conservation Plan to develop a comprehensive plan for the Delta. Although promising, these efforts must first overcome the scientific uncertainty, interest group intransigence, and lack of political leadership that doomed previous efforts. John Cain will describe the new and newly recycled proposals for re- plumbing and restoring the Bay-Delta watershed that have emerged from these forums, and discuss the enormous political, technical, and economic challenges toward breaking the stalemate that has characterized the Delta debate for the last two decades.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0157

PDF of PowerPoint
(62 slides)
Caldwell, Meg
April 13, 2010
Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University "Coastal Communities and the Blue Planet"
YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0181
Candee, Hamilton
May 10, 2005
Senior Attorney & Co-Director, Western Water Project, Natural Resources Defense Council "The Continuing Battle to Restore the San Joaquin River"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0140
Cassidy, John
May 14, 2002
Consulting Water Resources Engineer "Role of dams in water resources"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0120

PowerPoint
(8.17MB)
Christian-Smith, Juliet &
Dr. David Zoldoske

February 9, 2010
Pacific Institute
CSU Fresno, Center for Irrigation Technology
"The Future of Irrigated Agriculture:Where’s the Water?"
YouTube


DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0179

PDF of Christian-Smith's PowerPoint
(39 slides)
PDF of Zoldoske's PowerPoint
(40 slides)
Cluer, Brian
March 9, 2010
Fluvial Geomorphologist (Coordinator), NOAA Southwest Regional Office "Salmon, Orphans Without a Home: An Historical Perspective of the Water and Landscape Modifications to Salmon Habitat"
YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0180

PDF of Cluer's PowerPoint
(53 slides)
Cohen, Andrew N.
March 14, 2006
Senior Scientist and Director of the Biological Invasions Program, San Francisco Estuary Institute "The Invaded Estuary: Exotic Species in San Francisco Bay"
Abstract: The San Francisco Bay Estuary is one of the most highly invaded aquatic ecosystems in the world. The arrival of exotic organisms has altered its species composition, food webs and population dynamics, and exotics now account for most of the species, individuals and biomass across many of the estuary's habitats. This presentation will discuss the state of these invasions, how they've arrived, what changes they've caused, and what if anything can be done about them.

YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0146

PowerPoint
(5 slides; Note that Cohen's non PowerPoint projected slides are only available by viewing the video.)
Cooley, Heather
April 8, 2008
Senior Research Associate, Pacific Institute "Desalination, With a Grain of Salt: A California Perspective"
Abstract: Long considered the Holy Grail of water supply, desalination offers the potential of an unlimited source of fresh water purified from the vast oceans of salt water that surround us. The public, politicians, and water managers continue to hope that cost-effective and environmentally safe ocean desalination will come to the rescue of water- short regions.

Interest in desalination has been especially high in California, where rapidly growing populations, inadequate regulation of the water supply/land-use nexus, and ecosystem degradation from existing water supply sources have forced a rethinking of water policies and management. In the past five years, public and private entities have put forward more than 20 proposals for large desalination facilities along the California coast. Project proponents point to statewide water-supply constraints, the reliability advantages of "drought-proof" supply, the water quality improvements offered by desalinated water, and the benefits of local control. Along with the proposals, however, has come a growing public debate about high economic and energy costs, environmental and social impacts, and consequences for coastal development policies. This presentation discusses the advantages and disadvantages of seawater desalination within the context of California.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0163 PDF of PowerPoint
(23 slides)
Cuffey, Kurt
November 8, 2005
Professor of Geology, UC Berkeley "Glaciers and the California Waterscape"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0143
Denton, Richard
April 10, 2001
Water Manager, Contra Costa Water District "Understanding the Delta : an engineering perspective"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0104

PowerPoint
(9.4MB)
Douglas, Peter
September 14, 2004
Executive Director, California Coastal Commission "Saving the coast: a job that’s never done"
YouTube
YouTube
VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0133
Dunne, Thomas
May 6, 2008
Professor, Geomorphology and Hydrology, UC Santa Barbara Bren School of Environmental Science and Management "River Migration and the Diversity of Floodplains"
Abstract: The talk will describe river migration processes and the ways in which they generate floodplain complexity in rivers of South America and California. It will aim to provoke a discussion of the dynamic aspects of large rivers and their floodplains that are of interest to policy making and conservation planning and the nature of scientific understanding that can be assimilated into the policy-making process.
[no video]

PDF of PowerPoint
(48 slides)
Fisher, Andrew T.
November 10, 2009
Professor, Earth & Planetary Sciences, UC Santa Cruz "Dynamics and impacts of managed aquifer recharge on water supply and quality in the Pajaro Valley" [Awaiting video from UCTV]

WRCA does not have permission to post Fisher's PPT.
Frank, Richard M.
September 9, 2008
Executive Director, California Center for Environmental Law & Policy; Professor, UC Berkeley School of Law "Saving the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: An Ecosystem & Water Delivery System in Crisis"
Abstract: By all accounts, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is in peril. Its ecosystem is currently on life support; the levee system that defines the Delta's current topography is fragile and crumbling; the Delta's viability as a water supply system for 23 million Californians is increasingly suspect; and looming impacts of climate change threaten to make all these conditions even worse.

Faced with this dire scenario, California's political leaders are exploring unprecedented means of saving the Delta. Richard Frank, Executive Director of the Berkeley Law School's California Center for Environmental Law & Policy and a member of Governor Schwarzenegger's appointed Delta Vision Task Force, will discuss the Delta, the work of the Task Force, its potential recommendations for the Governor and California Legislature, and a prognosis for the Delta's future.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0165

PDF of PowerPoint
(35 slides)
Gastelum, Ron
March 13, 2001
General Manager, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California "Past, present & future for MWD" n/a
Gleick, Peter
October 10, 2000
Director, Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment & Security "Global warming" n/a
Glennon, Robert
December 7, 2004
Morris K. Udall Professor of Law & Public Policy, University of Arizona "Water follies: the environmental consequences of groundwater pumping"
Prof. Glennon is the author of Water Follies : Groundwater Pumping and the Fate of America's Fresh Waters (Island Press, 2002) [WRCA call no. 64.1 P2-1]

YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0136

PowerPoint
(35 slides, 13.9MB)
Graff, Tom
December 10, 2002
California Regional Director, Environmental Defense "Environmental advocacy : a practioner's historical perspective"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0119
Griffin, Martin L., Jr.
March 8, 2005
Founder, Friends of the Russian River "The Gravel Pirates: Strip-mining the Russian River Water Supply"
NOTE: Dates of litigation in Dr. Griffin's lecture may be incorrect. Please consult Appendix 2 (p. 256) in his book, Saving the Marin-Sonoma Coast: The Battles for Audubon Canyon Ranch, Point Reyes, & California's Russian River, [WRCA call no. G413 N8-4] for the correct dates.

YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0138
Hanak, Ellen
April 10, 2007
Research Fellow, Public Policy Institute of California "Envisioning Futures for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta"
Abstract: The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is the hub of California’s water supply system, home to a unique and threatened ecosystem and to a vibrant recreational and agricultural economy. Recent research has exposed serious problems in the Delta, including precipitous declines in some fish species and increasing threats to the stability of the levee system. In this lecture, Ellen Hanak will present the results of a recent study she co-authored that explores alternatives for resolving these problems, ranging from fortifying the levee system, to building various forms of a peripheral canal, to reducing water exports to Southern California and converting parts of the Delta to habitats more suitable for desirable species.
Download or order "Envisioning Futures for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta" / Jay Lund, Ellen Hanak, William Fleenor, Richard Howitt, Jeffrey Mount, and Peter Moyle at http://www.ppic.org/main/publication.asp? i=671

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0155

PowerPoint
(9.19MB, 39 slides)
Herndon, Roy
May 9, 2006
Chief Hydrogeologist, Orange County Water District "Recycled Water: Conveying the Message to Non-Water Experts"
Abstract: Mr. Herndon presentd examples of the challenges and successes that he and his agency, the Orange County Water District (OCWD), have had in communicating complex ideas with a diverse community. OCWD is responsible for managing a large groundwater basin that provides about 60 percent of the water supply to a growing population of 2.3 million in northern Orange County. OCWD is a leader in the development and use of recycled water for public supply. Were it not for a clear message, supported by sound science and economics, brought to the community in multiple venues, it would not have been possible to gain support for building what will be the world's largest indirect potable water supply recycling project. As a hydrogeologist, Mr. Herndon sees the need to bridge the knowledge gap with those without groundwater science backgrounds, often including people in decision-making roles. In one example, some simple graphics were instrumental in illustrating complex hydrogeologic issues with serious ramifications if certain steps were not taken to reduce groundwater pumping quantities in recent years. Although these steps were politically risky, OCWD's board of directors was able to make the tough decision based on clear technical information. OCWD's team of engineers, geologists, information systems analysts, biologists, facility operators, field technicians, chemists, accountants, communications representatives, administrators, and attorneys represent a cross section of the skills necessary to manage a large water resource.

YouTube>

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0148

PowerPoint
(39 slides)
Hobbs, Greg
October 10, 2006
Justice, Colorado Supreme Court "The Role of Climate on Water Institutions in the Western Americas"
Abstract: Justice Hobbs addresses the role of climate in shaping water history, culture, policies, laws, and institutions in the western Americas. He draws on paleo-hydrological work in Peru and the southwestern United States as a framework for exploring adaptation of contemporary water policy and law, with concentration on the Colorado River Basin. Justice Hobbs is the author of In Praise of Fair Colorado, The Practice of Poetry, History, and Judging (Bradford Publishing Co. 2004) and Colorado Mother of Rivers, Water Poems (Colorado Foundation for Water Education 2005).

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0150

PDF of PowerPoint
(46.6MB, 61p.)
Huffman, Jared
October 13, 2009
CA State Assemblyman, District 6 "Resolving the Delta Crisis"
Abstract: The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is one of California?s crown jewels, but it has suffered from crisis for several years. The Delta is, at once, the most valuable estuary ecosystem on the coast of North and South America and the heart of the California water system. But it is a dying ecosystem: crashing fisheries; third consecutive year of drought for most of the state; second consecutive year of no salmon season in California. Scientists agree that there are three major factors contributing to the demise of the Delta -- excessive water diversions, polluted runoff and discharges from farms and cities, and invasive species. But there is a fourth culprit -- the lack of accountable, transparent, and effective water governance. Government agencies in the Delta -- more than 200 of them - - have failed to resolve this crisis. The most important decision the Legislature faces is whether to continue with the status quo or launch a new governance and planning framework for the Delta. The Delta's status quo does not look too good right now. The status quo makes legislative action the critical link to rebuilding a positive future for the Delta.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0176
Ingram, B. Lynn
March 13, 2007
Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Geography, University of California, Berkeley "Late Pleistocene to Holocene Evolution of the San Francisco Bay"
Abstract: The San Francisco Bay and Delta are considered the heart of California's water system. A huge region of California (about 40%) is drained by rivers that eventually reach the San Francisco Bay. San Francisco Bay is California's largest estuary, and is a vital part of its economy, culture, and landscape. The Bay's inland Delta provides fresh water to two-thirds of the population of California, some twenty three million people. Sediments deposited beneath the Bay, within surrounding marshlands, and within the Bay's watershed contain a rich history of how this estuarine system evolved over the past million years, including major changes in climate. These sediments demonstrate that the Bay has only existed sporadically - during warmer interglacial periods, and became a river valley during the ice ages. While the earliest inhabitants of California adapted to a varying water supply, archaeological and geological evidence suggests that climate extremes - both wetter and drier - have occurred throughout the past 10,000 years.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0154

PDF of PowerPoint
(86.2 MB, 69p.)
Jacobs, Diana
November 14, 2006
Deputy Director and Science Advisor (retired), California Department of Fish & Game "Tales of the New Fish Patrol: Saving California's Largest River - the Mighty Sacramento"
Abstract: The Sacramento River is California’s premier river, with the largest salmon runs, greatest riparian forests, biggest floods, and critically important water supply for cities and farms. Diana Jacobs, Ph. D., reviewed her 25 years of experience collaborating (or sometimes fighting) to restore the river’s fish and wildlife resources. She also related harrowing tales and lessons learned in balancing protection of Public Trust resources and environmental values with demand for other public benefits, including flood control, water supply and local land use patterns. Lastly, the current post- Katrina politics of flood control in California - and what that means for rivers in the State's Great Central Valley, were discussed.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0151

PDF of PowerPoint
(31.7MB, 95 slides)
Kennedy, David
May 11, 2004
Former Director of the California Department of Water Resources "The evolution of California water policy"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0132
Kidson, Renée
[Special lecture]
February 17, 2009
Chief Hydrologist (Water Accounting), Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology "Balancing Water Supply & Demand in Australia: Hard Lessons from a Harsh Land"
YouTube


VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0170

PDF of PowerPoint
(47 slides)
Konikow, Leonard
May 5, 2009
Scientist, U.S. Geological Survey "Ground Water Depletion: A National Assessment and Global Perspective"
Abstract: Development of ground-water resources for agricultural, industrial, and municipal purposes greatly expanded during the 20th century, and economic gains from ground-water use have been dramatic. In many places, however, ground-water reserves have been depleted to the extent that well yields have decreased, pumping costs have increased, water quality has deteriorated, aquatic ecosystems have been damaged by reduced ground-water discharge, and land has irreversibly subsided. Some causes and effects of groundwater depletion, however, are neither obvious nor easy to assess. A surprisingly large fraction of ground water pumped from confined aquifers derives from storage losses in adjacent confining layers, but depletion in low-permeability layers is difficult to estimate, rarely monitored, and too often overlooked. A new simplified method for estimating depletion from confining layers was developed, tested, and applied. Results indicate that depletion of storage in confining layers can greatly exceed the depletion from the confined aquifer itself. A nationwide assessment indicates that more than 700 km3 of water was depleted from ground-water systems in the U.S. in the past 100 years. Worldwide, the magnitude of ground-water depletion from storage may already be large enough to constitute a small but measurable contribution to sea-level rise during the 20th century.

YouTube


DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0173

[permission not granted]
Levy, Thomas
October 14, 2003
Consultant "A paranoid’s view of the Colorado River"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0126
Littleworth, Art
February 13, 2001
Attorney at Law, Best, Best & Krieger "Legal issues and challenges for the next decade" n/a
McCarty, Perry L.
November 13, 2007
Silas H. Palmer Professor Emeritus, Environmental Engineering and Science, Stanford University "Climate Change Implications of Waste Treatment"
Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that four percent of the equivalent anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in the world result from methane and nitrous oxide produced from wastewater, solid wastes, and animal manure. However, if such methane gas is collected and used as a biofuel, not only would the methane emissions decrease, but also the need for fossil fuels could be decreased as well. Indeed, the potential to produce methane from wastewater treatment might be exploited to a greater extent than it has at present to turn a potential problem into a significant benefit for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. How might wastes best be handled in the future to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and how might this change our current practices? These questions will be explored in this seminar.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0159

PDF of PowerPoint
(65 slides)
McKay, Jennifer M.
February 10, 2009
Director, Centre for Comparative Water Policies and Laws University of South Australia "Taking a Lesson from Australia's New Water Law Regime"
Abstract: Australian water law is now in its fifth epoch with the passing of the Water Act in 2007. The lecture will review the other epochs and the pitfalls inherent in these epochs. The water law processes in each epoch will be cast in the light of the social contracts and political movements that fostered them and the changes leading to the transition to the new epoch.

Pitfalls and success stories will be presented for epoch 4 with emphasis on the regional water planning process. These have great lessons to offer. The latest epoch represents a radical legal change overcoming Constitutional impediments and other socio political challenges.

YouTube


DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0169

PDF of PowerPoint
(75 slides)
McKereghan, Peter
May 4, 2010
Environmental Restoration Division; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory "History of a Ground Water Cleanup Project: LLNL Livermore Site"
YouTube


DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0182

PDF of McKereghan's PowerPoint
(87 slides)
McLaughlin, Sylvia
September 9, 2003
Co-founder of Save The Bay "Four decades of saving the bay"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0125
Miller, Norman
December 6, 2005
Staff Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Adjunct Professor of Hydrology, University of Arizona, Tuscon "Can California's Water Infrastructure Sustain Future Climate Change?"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0144

PDF of PowerPoint
(63 slides)
Morgan, James
April 8, 2003
Goldberger Professor of Environmental Engineering Science, Emeritus; California Institute of Technology "The water matrix : a quantity to quality transition in the new century"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0123

PowerPoint
(34.3MB)
Mount, Jeff
February 14, 2006
Director, UC Center for Watershed Science "Hell and High Water in the Delta: The Fate of California's Water Supply Hub"
Abstract: The Sacramento- San Joaquin Delta supplies the valley with water for communities, agriculture, recreation, and habitats for fish and wildlife. But the evolving landscape and ecosystem of the Delta are changing at a pace that surpasses the scientific and political communities’ ability to respond. Professor Jeff Mount discusses the principal issues impacting the future of Delta and demonstrates how current trends will affect the future of its waterways. He also addresses the fact that the "Delta debate" seems to be going nowhere. To conclude, Professor Mount outlines six broad future options for this important water supply hub in order to spark more discussion and debate.

YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0145

PowerPoint
(46 slides)
Moyle, Peter
February 12, 2002
Professor of Fish Biology, University of California, Davis "Alien invaders, endangered natives, and declining fisheries : a history of fish in the upper San Francisco estuary"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0113
Mulroy, Pat
May 1, 2007
General Manager, Southern Nevada Water Authority "Overcoming the Traditions That Divide Us - Tomorrow's Reliable Water Supply Dependent Upon Partnerships"
Abstract: The new reality of the West is simple: it is comprised of communities, states and regions increasingly interdependent on one another for natural resources and the economic livelihood that flows from them. In the case of water, that interdependence is made more important by the fact that water is essential for any living creature to survive. As a result, a public trust issue necessarily underlies any undertaking or negotiation that involves water. Decision-making, planning and positions must be respectful of that trust and the interdependence that drives it. By working together for consensus solutions and by ensuring that water laws and agreements remain flexible to changing conditions, water agencies will set a new standard for resource management that will see the West through the next century.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0156
Null, Sarah1
--
Rosekrans, Spreck 2
--
Lund, Jay3
September 13, 2005
1Doctoral Student, Geography, UC Davis
--
2Economic Analyst, Environmental Defense
--
3Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UC Davis
"Hetch Hetchy Valley: Water and California's Future"
The following article was published by Null and Lund post lecture: "Restoring Hetch Hetchy Valley: The Role of Modeling in Policy" / by S.E. Null and J.R. Lund. IN: EOS, Vol. 87, No. 42, 17 October 2006 (p. 449,453).

YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0141

Powerpoint
Null (23 slides, 2.5MB)
PowerPoint
Rosekrans (28 slides, 22.5MB)
Orlob, Gerald T.
September 12, 2000
Professor Emeritus, University of California, Davis "Saving the Salton Sea?" n/a
Palmquist, Peter
December 12, 2000
Photographer and Author "19th Century water images" n/a
Patt, Olney, Jr.
February 8, 2005
Executive Director Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission "Nature of Indian Water Rights"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA G402 XU2-9 #0137
Piégay, Hérve
December 8, 2009
Research Director, National Centre for Scientific Research "The Espace de Liberté: Managing with River Processes"
Abstract: After a long tradition of hard engineering of rivers, France and the EU are moving to a new paradigm of river management that sets aside a corridor within which the river can migrate and flood. Even downstream of large dams, many rivers still experience sufficiently large floods to inundate floodplains, erode banks, deposit gravel bars, develop complex channel geometries, and establish riparian vegetation critical for many species. Likewise, oxbow lakes and other off-channel water bodies provide critically important habitats for important species. Results from a multi-year research program shed light on the processes needed to maintain ecologically diverse habitats along the Sacramento River, drawing upon sedimentologic studies, vegetation analysis, and analysis of historical change from aerial photography. Management experience on the Ain and other French rivers suggests that many conflicts along the Sacramento River could be obviated by application of the concept of the 'Espace de Liberté', whereby the river is given a corridor within which it can dynamically erode and flood. In the 100-mi reach from Red Bluff to Colusa, nearly half of the riparian lands likely to be eroded within the next 50 years has been purchased or placed under conservation easement, paving the way for an eventual corridor for the river.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0178

WRCA does not have permission to post Piégay's PPT
Pisani, Donald
November 9, 2004
Merrick Professor of History, University of Oklahoma "When myth trumps history: the Reclamation Bureau and the family farm, 1902-1935"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0135
Pister, Philip
September 10, 2002
Executive Secretary, Desert Fishes Council "Desert fishes : reflections on reality, desirability, and conscience"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0116

Poole, Randy
February 12, 2008
General Manager/Chief Engineer, Sonoma County Water Agency "Leading the Way: A Look at the Sonoma County North American Climate Initiative"
Why is North America lagging in implementation of climate-protecting technologies and what can be done to actually bring solid, permanent reductions in North American CO2 emissions? Part of the answer is that textbook solutions are at this time unproven. North America needs to prove that technology for energy efficiency, renewable power, biofuels, hybrid drive systems and carbon sequestration can reduce emissions, and that these technologies offer economic benefits and that they will find acceptance, even support, from the public. The North American Climate Initiative, as led by the Sonoma County Water Agency (SCWA), would provide the needed proof of concept by establishing one or more regional demonstration projects with the United States or Canada where the technologies would be tested. The programs would implement technological solutions, identify those that are viable and would monitor and document emissions reductions. Demonstration projects would provide the package of technologies that could be replicated rapidly nationwide, even globally to achieve climate protection goals well ahead of the 2020 targets set before us. Water supply, treatment, distribution and disposal are integral to the program. Water-related activities consume 19% of California’s electric power and 30% of its natural gas. Water policy decisions such as recycling, conservation, desalination have direct impacts on carbon emissions. This lecture will provide an overview the program and how, if implemented, it would allow SCWA to supply water produced with zero carbon emissions by 2015.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0161

PDF of PowerPoint
(31 slides)
Preston, William
May 13, 2003
Professor of Geography, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo "The environmental history of Tulare Lake"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0124
Price, Kevin
April 13, 2004
Manager of the Water Treatment Engineering Research & Development Group, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation "Desalination issues in the United States"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0131

PowerPoint
(11.6MB)
Quinn, Tim
March 10, 2009
Executive Director, Association of California Water Agencies "California Water: Managing Crisis and Opportunity"
Abstract: California is experiencing its worst water crisis in history with drought combining with increasing regulatory restrictions and inadequate infrastructure to generate significant negative impacts on both the environment and economy. This presentation explores the root causes and possible solutions to this crisis. California’s water system was conceived and constructed under very different natural resource policies than those that exist today. In the mid 20th century, natural resource policies focused on resource extraction for human economic purposes. As we move into the 21st century, natural resource policies are focused on the restoration and sustainability of the environment, quite apart from any economic value to human beings. Not surprisingly, the physical system that was conceived under extraction policies in the 20th century is characterized by high levels of conflict between society’s 21st century environmental and economic goals. Governor Schwarzenegger’s Blue Ribbon Delta Vision Task Force has recently completed its work with sweeping recommendations to overhaul the state’s water infrastructure and water management practices to accomplish the coequal goals of environmental restoration and water supply reliability. These recommendations will be reviewed with an eye toward their potential to set California on a sustainable path as we transition from an extraction to a sustainability natural resource policy.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0171

PDF of PowerPoint
(31 slides)
Resh, Vincent
October 23, 2001
Professor of Entomology and Parasitology, University of California, Berkeley "Streams in Mediterranean climates" YouTube
VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0109
SPECIAL EVENT
Riley, Don
October 8, 2009
Major General, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Location: Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Hall
"The Art and Science of Managing a Public Engineering Organization"

YouTube


DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0175
Ritchie, Steve
February 3, 2007
Executive Project Manager, South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project "The South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project: The Wild Heart of Silicon Valley"
Abstract: In 2003, the State of California and the U.S. government, with substantial support from private foundations, purchased 15,100 acres of salt production ponds adjoining South San Francisco Bay from Cargill Corporation. These ponds represent an incredible opportunity for shoreline habitat restoration and public access in the San Francisco Bay Area. This is the largest habitat restoration project in the Western U.S. (http://www.southbayrestoration.org/) and it must be accomplished without increasing flood risk to Silicon Valley while providing for public access. The restoration process is expected to take decades to complete. This presentation will describe the initial management of the ponds as they are taken out of salt production and the five-year planning process for their ultimate restoration. Adaptive management will be integral to the restoration process. Particular opportunities and challenges (both scientific and institutional) of the planning process will be described as the Project moves toward changing the South San Francisco Bay landscape.

YouTube
DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0153

PowerPoint
(85MB, 94 slides)
Robie, Ron
October 8, 2002
Associate Justice, Court of Appeal, Third Appellate District "California's water : perspectives from the bench"
YouTube
VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0117
Rodríguez-Iturbe, Ignacio
February 10, 2004
Pitney Professor of Environmental Studies and Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Princeton University "Frontiers of hydrologic research in the 21st Century"
YouTube
VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0129

PowerPoint
(206 MB)
Rogers, J. David
November 12, 2002
Karl F. Hasselmann Missouri Chair in Geological Engineering at the University of Missouri- Rolla "Dams and disasters : a brief overview of dam building in California"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0118 PowerPoint
(93.5MB)
Sax, Joseph L.
October 9, 2001
Professor, Boalt School of Law, University of California, Berkeley "Public trust : philosophical and legal implications for California's future"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0110
Saykally, Richard
May 8, 2001
Professor of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley "What makes water wet?"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0105
Schladow, Geoffrey
December 9, 2008
Director, Tahoe Environmental Research Center; Professor, UC Davis Civil and Environmental Engineering "Lake Tahoe: What Will It Look Like in 2040?"
Abstract: In 1964, the Lake Tahoe Regional Council published the 1980 Regional Plan for the Lake Tahoe basin. The planned called for, among other things, the development of double and triple bands of highway around the lake and a highway bridge across the mouth of Emerald Bay. Four decades later, much of the physical infrastructure and the unbridled development that the Regional Plan envisaged has not come to pass. However, development did occur, and the lake is very different now than it was in 1964. How has Lake Tahoe changed in the last 40 years and, more importantly, how will it change in the future? This presentation will focus on three elements that are likely to be the major drivers of change at Lake Tahoe. These are the implementation of a TMDL program to restore lake clarity, the rapid spread of aquatic invasive species, and climate change.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0168

PDF of PowerPoint
(46 slides)
Schmidt, John (Jack) C.
November 18, 2003
Associate Professor of Aquatic, Watershed & Earth Resources, Utah State University "Channel change of the Colorado River : a mandate for restoration?"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0127
Seed, Ray
September 12, 2006
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley "New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina: Lessons for California’s Levees"
Abstract: The recent flooding and devastation of the greater New Orleans region during hurricane Katrina represented the most costly peace-time failure of an engineered system in North American history. Extensive investigations and analyses have been performed by several major teams in the wake of this disaster, and some very important lessons have been learned. Many of these have very direct and urgent applications to California’s levee systems and flood risk exposure, and to the security of our State’s vital water supply systems. Professor Seed discusses what California can learn from New Orleans and how to prevent a similar catastrophe from happening here.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0149

PDF of PowerPoint
(13MB, 73p.)
Simmons, Bill
March 12, 2002
Professor of Anthropology, Brown University "Water and the creations of indian California"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0114
Sophocleous, Marios
November 18, 2008
Senior Scientist, Kansas Geological Survey "Groundwater Sustainability and its Application in Kansas"
Abstract: This presentation concentrates on the hydro-ecological underpinnings of groundwater sustainability and points out how hydrologic fundamentals can be used to develop a sound water-use planning policy for stream-aquifer systems. The transition curves of all major aquifer systems from groundwater storage depletion to induced recharge of surface water need to be identified, and stream- aquifer numerical models are advocated for this purpose. The presentation also addresses the more general concept of sustainability from the systems perspective and outlines our still-evolving ideas on environmental sustainability. The Kansas water resources management experience and its evolution towards achieving sustainability are then outlined. This experience includes the establishment of local Groundwater Management Districts and their water management policies, minimum streamflow and TMDL (Total Maximum Daily Load) standards, conjunctive stream-aquifer policies, integrated resource planning, subbasin water resources management, and other programs. "Safe yield" rules, such as pumping the natural recharge, are shown to lead to degradation of streams, springs, wetlands, and water-dependent ecosystems. Because of the interdependence of surface water and ground water, operations on one have consequences for the other. Therefore, the importance of integrated resource planning and management harmonizing environment and society is stressed. The presentation concludes with suggestions to move forward in sustaining water resources, stressing precautionary principles, the dynamic and iterative nature of sustainability assessments, the need for adaptive management, for increasing the productivity of water, and for long-time public education supported by research and technical assistance, as well as improved communications, so that people become more conscious of the complexities and constraints involved in water-resources management.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0167

PDF of PowerPoint
(45 slides)
Stine, Scott
February 11, 2003
Professor of Geography & Environmental Studies, California State University Hayward "Droughts and deluges of California's past millennium"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0121
Swanson, Christina
September 8, 2009
Director, The Bay Institute California Water and Fisheries as a Living Laboratory for Adaptive Management: A Big Picture Perspective from a Scientist Advocate"
Abstract: As we enter the 21st century, California faces new challenges for management of its water and fisheries resources. Most of the scientific, resource management, legal and political attention to these issues focuses on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the crossroads linking California’s largest watershed, the west coast’s largest estuary, and one of the world’s largest and most complex water management systems. If you take a big picture and expansive view of it, the Delta we have today is the result of decades of "adaptive management". Unfortunately, the current status of water resource management and our fisheries in the Delta and its watershed indicates that further adjustments are needed.

For improved adaptive management of this critically important confluence of water resources and aquatic ecosystems, I suggest five key questions that must form the foundation for developing, implementing and evaluating the plan. First, we need start with clear understanding of "what have we got?" For example, adaptive management of water resources should start with fact-based and accurate evaluation of supply, intra- and inter- annual variability attributable to uncontrolled (i.e., non-managed) factors, the current level of exploitation and/or management, and science-based projections on changes to those parameters in the future. Second, we need to decide and agree on "what do we want?" Management goals should be based on both scientific understanding of what is necessary for sustainability, consider societal needs and objectives, and be very clearly articulated. The next question, "what factors affect the things that we want?" requires scientific understanding of the key physical and biological drivers, both controlled and uncontrolled, that influence the desired management outcomes we have identified. After implementation of management actions, the first evaluation of monitoring data should be to ask "have we changed the system?" For example, has a management action designed to improve flow conditions actually done so? And finally, we need to answer the question "are we there yet" using quantitative indicators or performance measures that are clearly linked to management goal. In this presentation, I will discuss and provide some recent examples of how these questions have (or have not) been addressed in the past and ongoing planning and management efforts.

YouTube


DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0174

PDF of PowerPoint
(42 slides)
Taugher, Mike
December 5, 2006
Environmental Reporter, Contra Costa Times "When the Environment and Politics Collide: Recent Developments in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta"
Abstract: In early 2005, scientists noticed that fish populations in the Delta were mysteriously collapsing. It was the latest and loudest environmental alarm for what is perhaps the most important source of water in a state that this utterly dependent on being able to move water around. The ecological crisis in the Delta was also a sign that the policies in place to protect the Delta and California’s water supply were failing. Contra Costa Times reporter Mike Taugher discusses the environmental and public policy problems confronting the Delta and the ongoing efforts to resolve them.
YouTube

DVD available at WRCA VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0152

PDF of PowerPoint
(24 slides)
Thompson, Barton "Buzz" H., Jr.
March 11, 2008
Robert E. Paradise Professor of Natural Resources Law and Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University "Protecting Watershed Services Through Law, Regulation and Markets"
Abstract: Among the most valuable of ecosystem services are those related to watersheds, including water quality and flow regulation. New York City’s decision in the 1990s to invest in watershed protection in the Catskills and Delaware water basins has led many to believe or hope that markets and public policies focused on the value of these services can increase conservation of key watershed lands. A survey completed two years ago, however, showed little effort by most water suppliers in California to protect their watersheds. In some regions of the nation, water suppliers are even selling off watershed lands or managing the land in a way that might undermine water quality. This presentation will look at what efforts private and public entities are currently taking place (or not taking place) to protect these "watershed services," what the potential is (and obstacles are) to protecting watersheds through their services, and what public policies the government could pursue to promote greater protection of watershed services and thus the watersheds that provide them. This examination of watershed services will also offer insights into the opportunities provided by the broader concept of ecosystem services.

YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0162

PDF of PowerPoint
(43 slides)
Todd, David K.
April 9, 2002
President Todd Engineers and Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley "Managing groundwater resources"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0115
Wescoat, James, Jr.
March 11, 2003
Professor of Landscape Architecture, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign "Water in landscape heritage conservation & design : lessons from the Taj Mahal"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0122
Whittington, Dale
October 11, 2005
Professor of Environmental Science & Engineering, City and Regional Planning, and Public Policy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill "A Global Perspective on Investments in Municipal Water and Sanitation Infrastructure" n/a

 

Wills, Leah
November 14, 2000
Economist, The Plumas Corporation "Upstream watersheds" n/a
Wolff, Gary
October 14, 2008
Vice-chair, California State Water Resources Control Board "Successes and Failures in California Water Regulation"
YouTube

DVD available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0166

PDF of PowerPoint
(34 slides)
Wright, Patrick
November 13, 2001
Director, CALFED Bay-Delta Program "The CALFED Bay-Delta Program and the future of California water policy"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0111
Zoback, Mark
October 12, 2004
Professor of Geophysics, Stanford University "Fluids and faulting: water and earthquakes in California"
YouTube

VHS available at WRCA

G402 XU2-9 #0134

PowerPoint
(53 slides, 17.8MB)
Last modified: 4/27/2011 5:36 PM by S. Haren

UCR Contact Information

Water Resources Collections and Archives
Tomás Rivera Library, 4th Floor
PO Box 5900
University of California
Riverside, CA 92517-5900

Tel: 951-827-3233    Fax: 951-827-4673    email Email

CSUSB Contact Information

Water Resources Institute, CSUSB
Boykin Witherspoon III, Institute Director
California State University, San Bernardino
PL-401 5500 University Parkway
San Bernardino CA 92407-2318

Tel: 909-537-3685    email Email

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